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Aaron Hunt

Aaron Hunt

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Alex Garland’s Sci-Fi Adaptation "Annihilation" Prefers Its People (Spoiler-Full)

The Following Contains SPOILERS:

Rainbow refractions spawned from the ineffable “shimmer” form shafts through the foliage and spike the lens, and the DNA oscillating flora and fauna of this jelly dome - a bear harnessing the dying moans and carrion of a human victim (Tuva Novotny as Sheppard) frank among them - instills an uncanny palsy. But don’t mistake your horror as alien, the bear’s anthropoid aspects cause the tremble. Writer/Director Alex Garland has taken high-concept, hard science-fiction material, and cambered it into a domestic parable.

Writer/Director Nathan Silver On The Fate and Form of Thirst Street

Thirst Street, a sordid trauma study with a twist on fairy tale idealizations, denotes a significant departure from Silver’s unbound form to something more staged and mannered. As the fate of Silver’s characters come to question, and the fabled nature of fate itself does too, we endure a Silver tragedy at its most pre-designed. 

From his usual outlines to a 25 page treatment, Thirst Street still maintains some of Silver's unscripted sensibilities. Dialogue was improvised. Shots were intuited on the day, guided by the atmosphere of a setting and the emotional necessities of a scene. Still it maintains a form, with a stylized beginning & end, and a more fluid, naturalistic, midsection. 

Nathan details the use of these new formal elements, the ways which they apply thematically to Thirst Street, and their current and hoped for evolutions in his future work. 

Thirst Street follows Gina (Lindsay Burge) an American flight attendant who, after the suicide of her husband, finds a dream in Paris worth living for. But, as we quickly discover, that dream ends up being just one in a slew of questionable authenticities. 

D.P Andrew Droz Palermo on prepping and re-adapting for A Ghost Story

Would you have guessed the bulk of A Ghost Story’s aesthetic was decided on set, day to day? I wouldn’t have, and I didn’t. The fact derailed everything I thought I knew about cinematographer Andrew Droz Palermo (You’re Next, Rich Hill, A Teacher) and Writer/Director David Lowery’s ( Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, Pete’s Dragon) formal motivations and forced the interview to operate in a spontaneous mode similar to the film’s production.

Will Poulter || Playing The Centerpiece of Audience Scorn || Detroit

Kathryn Bigelow has reentered the awards season with Detroit; offering the best ensemble cast you’ll see all year (both big name and soon to be breakout stars) Bigelow puts us in the murkier throes of the 1967 Detroit Riots by resurfacing some of its buried horrors. In the Algiers Motel incident three black teenage boys were slain by the hand of their protectors. One murder was left unsolved and the others were ruled “Justifiable Homicide” allowing all involved cops to walk unconvicted.

Philippe Le Sourd AFC || The Cinematography Of The Beguiled

Sofia Coppola now represents just the second woman of seventy Cannes Best Director Award winners. The Beguiled, her prize winner, is an immaculate exercise in aesthetic restraint. All facets of its design are an echo of the screams curdling beneath a relentless Southern gentility. 

Critical to this masterfully controlled technique is Coppola’s Oscar-nominated cinematographer Philippe Le Sourd AFC. Philippe and I discuss the film’s use of perspective, his unique low-contrast take to visualizing oppression, and camera movement's potential to disrupt the emotion of a scene.

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