log in

Writer/Director Nathan Silver On The Fate and Form of Thirst Street

Thirst Street, a sordid trauma study with a twist on fairy tale idealizations, denotes a significant departure from Silver’s unbound form to something more staged and mannered. As the fate of Silver’s characters come to question, and the fabled nature of fate itself does too, we endure a Silver tragedy at its most pre-designed. 

From his usual outlines to a 25 page treatment, Thirst Street still maintains some of Silver's unscripted sensibilities. Dialogue was improvised. Shots were intuited on the day, guided by the atmosphere of a setting and the emotional necessities of a scene. Still it maintains a form, with a stylized beginning & end, and a more fluid, naturalistic, midsection. 

Nathan details the use of these new formal elements, the ways which they apply thematically to Thirst Street, and their current and hoped for evolutions in his future work. 

Thirst Street follows Gina (Lindsay Burge) an American flight attendant who, after the suicide of her husband, finds a dream in Paris worth living for. But, as we quickly discover, that dream ends up being just one in a slew of questionable authenticities. 

Green Room DP, Sean Porter, Discusses Adapting for the Narrative

Sean Porter, of the indie darlings Kumiko The Treasure Hunter, Eden, It Felt Like Loveand I go in depth on the technical and conceptual aspects of his latest hit Green Room’s cinematography. We discuss small details like T-Stops and Focal lengths, and broader intentions like visual arcs brought on literally, not just metaphorically, by the script.

Porter began his career in the midst of the digital revolution which allowed him to shoot on 35mm and 16 while toying with digital from the advent.

John Michael Mcdonagh declares 'War On Everyone'

The Guard and Calvary were two of my favorite films to release in their respective years. Both reel with a jet black sense of humor and western style morality play with an emotionally ambiguous showdown in cessation. They also happen to be gorgeous, shot by Larry Smith (Gaffer/Chief electrician on Barry Lyndon/The Shining turned Only God Forgives/Bronson D.P) and composed in sickening symmetry. In short, I was ecstastic to meet the man behind it all, and his down to earth, silly, demeanor, ended up putting me at ease. John Michael McDonagh, talks about his third and bleakest feature film: War On Everyone. 

Subscribe to this RSS feed

Log in or create an account