Deep Blue Sea 3

JM
 
3.4
 
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Deep-Blue-Sea-3

Overview

Directed By
Written By
Official Synopsis
Emma Collins, an eminent marine biologist, and her crew have set up a mid-ocean laboratory over a sunken island town in the ocean where they are observing the first known Great White mating area. Unfortunately, the enhanced Bull Sharks that escaped in Deep Blue Sea 2 are also there with their own evolutionary goal: cross-breeding with the bigger faster Great Whites. The mission’s patron, Richard Lowell, believes that the Bull Sharks contain the key to intelligence enhancement, which he secretly intends to sell for big profits. Now, Emma and her crew are trapped on crumbling stilt houses mere feet over the ocean, caught between predators above and below the water.
Release Date
07/28/2020
MPAA Rating
R

The genetically engineered, super smart, sharks are once again causing havoc in Deep Blue Sea 3 in a sequel that manages to be even goofier, yet more entertaining. Check out our full review of the sequel!

My love of shark movies (monster movies in general) is well documented, so of course I had to check out the brand new Deep Blue Sea movie. The film arrives this week via digital release, while the blu-ray comes out on August 25th. Since it’s available to watch now, however, let’s chat about whether or not it’s worth the watch. 

I’m not entirely sure how, but here we are with a THIRD Deep Blue Sea film, just a couple years after the second film (which itself took us nearly 20 years to get). Unlike Deep Blue Sea 2, however, which seemed to essentially retell elements of the original, with only the barest of connections, the third film is a direct continuation on the events of the film that preceded it. 

If you forgot what happened in that film, some genetically modified bull shark pups got into the sinking scientific facility, causing all sorts of destruction and carnage. This was following on from their mother eavesdropping (I shit you not) on a conversation from the scientists about them being expendable. Despite the best efforts of the human survivors, three of the shark brothers managed to escape in the end. 

That’s an important bit to remember. Deep Blue Sea 3 picks up an indeterminate amount of time later, and puts the focus on Dr. Emma Collins. Her and her team are set up on a super small island town in the middle of the ocean (it’s up on stilts around a trench) to study the local Great White mating area. Things are going just fine until an old flame, Richard, shows up with a large boat, tons of equipment, and a bunch of gruff looking men. 

Turns out, those three Bull sharks have come into the mating grounds, and the men Richard’s brought with him have been hired by the company from the previous film to track them down and either capture or destroy them. When their tactics turn ultra-violent it puts everyone on the island at risk from more than just the sharks… 

I don’t want to go into more details to avoid spoilers, but suffice it to say, the plot features plenty of nonsensical elements. Not nearly as many as the second film, but just enough to let you know you shouldn’t take any of it seriously. This is both a good and bad thing. 

Where the second film tried way too hard to replicate the B-movie feel of the original, Deep Blue Sea 3 manages it much more naturally. It’s still goofy as all get out, but not in the same forced manner. This made it way more fun than and enjoyable to watch, though the result is there’s absolutely no emotional connection when the body count starts piling up. To be fair, the movie doesn’t waste much time with it either. It knows exactly what kind of movie it is and does what it wants. 

I kinda loved it. It’s not “good” and I don’t know that anyone is going to try and argue that, but Deep Blue Sea 3 is enjoyable in many ways. It throws in a little bit of everything, from the shark action, another moment where the sharks seem to understand English, ridiculously buff dudes, and a wholly unexpected martial arts fight! Seriously, it was kinda badass. It didn’t make a single lick of sense, but it was cool nonetheless. 

The overall visual effects in the film are about what you’d expect from a direct to blu-ray release. They aren’t quite the same level of cheesy as a SyFy Channel movie, but not at the level of a big screen film either. On the whole, I think they’re definitely a step up from Deep Blue Sea 2, along with the general production values. 

Getting away from the underwater science facility allowed them to shoot more on location, which made everything pop a little bit more (not nearly as many obviously fake walls). The sharks themselves look cleaner in the water, which helped sell the action. Again, not “great” but a step up from the previous film. 

This seems to be Deep Blue Sea 3’s defining attribute. While it still brings the goofiness and cheese, it’s definitely a step up from the previous film in pretty much every way. Frankly, much as I love movie/monster movies, I wasn’t looking forward to this one based off of Deep Blue Sea 2. Thankfully, I was pleasantly surprised. 

Editor review

1 reviews

Goofy Shark Action That Knows What it's Trying to Do
Overall rating 
 
3.4
Entertainment Value 
 
4.0
Story/Writing 
 
3.0
Performance (Acting) 
 
3.0
Direction 
 
3.5
Production 
 
3.5
I can’t say that Deep Blue Sea 3 is a good movie. I will say that it’s surprisingly enjoyable and works significantly better than Deep Blue Sea 2. Sure, there’s still plenty of goofy, nonsensical elements, but that’s a big part of the charm and fun. 

While I can’t say I’ll end up watching this multiple times, I could see myself enjoying it once again if it pops up on TV. As such, it’s hard to recommend it for purchase, especially when you factor in some special features that aren’t really worth a mention. If you’re looking for some fun monster movie action, however, it’s very much worth a Saturday night rental.
JM
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